Researchers look deep under the banana's skin

Image
Credit: Neil Palmer/CIAT

The very thing that makes bananas so easy to eat – they don’t have seeds – also makes them hard to breed. Beneath that simple observation, however, lies a very complicated evolutionary history, one that three recent papers by researchers with the CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas help to uncover and, as they do so, hold out promise for easier banana breeding.

Cultivated bananas are generally triploid; that is, they contain three sets of chromosomes, as opposed to the customary two sets of their diploid wild relatives. The chromosome sets are labeled A or B and come from two wild relatives, Musa acuminata and M. balbisiana.

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Description
This blog unpacks the findings from three scientific journal articles related to banana breeding.

Client
CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas

Service
Blog writing

Date
September 2019

Researchers look deep under the banana's skin

Image
Credit: Neil Palmer/CIAT

The very thing that makes bananas so easy to eat – they don’t have seeds – also makes them hard to breed. Beneath that simple observation, however, lies a very complicated evolutionary history, one that three recent papers by researchers with the CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas help to uncover and, as they do so, hold out promise for easier banana breeding.

Cultivated bananas are generally triploid; that is, they contain three sets of chromosomes, as opposed to the customary two sets of their diploid wild relatives. The chromosome sets are labeled A or B and come from two wild relatives, Musa acuminata and M. balbisiana.

Read blog

Description
This blog unpacks the findings from three scientific journal articles related to banana breeding.

Client
CGIAR Research Program on Roots, Tubers and Bananas

Service
Blog writing

Date
September 2019